En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
3 ratings

Tuesday - December 16, 2008

From: Hawthorn Woods, IL
Region: Midwest
Topic: Privacy Screening
Title: Screening plants for edge of pond in Illinois
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a backyard pond that I am restoring, adding aeration, plants, etc. Unfortunately, there is a farmer that stores old equipment on the shore of my pond and refuses to move it. It is an eyesore. Are there any perennial plants (Zone 5) that will grow tall in water and screen out some of this? I don't want it to overrun the pond though. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you.

ANSWER:

When you say the unwelcome equipment is at the shore of your pond, how close is that? Is the edge of your pond on your property and the farm equipment on his? There are plants that will grow in water in Zone 5, native to Illinois, that will provide some screening, and we will list them for you. There are also Illinois native trees and shrubs that don't grow IN water, but can grow in soggy soil at the edge of ponds or rivers, and would provide better screening still, but they would need some ground, maybe ten feet or so between the edge of your pond and the equipment. Unfortunately, none of these are evergreen, but at least they will help. To begin with the water plants:

Typha latifolia (broadleaf cattail) This perennial grows from 4 to 8 feet tall, with creeping rootstocks that form dense stands in shallow water, so it might be advisable to plant it in a large container underwater to prevent the pond being taken over by cattails.

Equisetum hyemale (scouringrush horsetail) Perennial growing in wet places, pond margins, swamps, to 3 feet tall.

For the area beyond the pond, if there is room, you could consider some willows, members of the Salix genus. Willows are fast-growing, but can be weak and susceptible to disease. They should be trimmed back vigorously every few years to encourage stronger growth. Perhaps by the time they need to be replaced or removed, the farm equipment will have rusted away. 

Salix caroliniana (coastal plain willow) Grows in wet soils of stream banks or swamps.

Salix discolor (pussy willow) Many-stemmed shrub or small tree, marshy low ground, stream banks.

Salix humilis (prairie willow) Alluvial or boggy areas, 6 to 12 feet tall.

And some plants that will do well in soggy ground, and provide even more screening.

Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) Rigid, upright perennial that grows well in low, wet areas, marshes. 

Cephalanthus occidentalis (common buttonbush) Found in swamps and around ponds and margins of streams.

Taxodium distichum (bald cypress) Adapted to moist habitats, provides some height and interest. 

Follow each plant link to a webpage on that plant, and go down to the bottom of the page and use the link to Google to get more information. These plants should all be commercially available. If you don't find them readily available in your area, go to our Native Plant Suppliers, type your town and state into the "Enter Search Location" box and you will get a list of native plant nurseries, seed companies and landscape consultants in your general area. 


Typha latifolia

Equisetum hyemale

Salix caroliniana

Salix discolor

Salix humilis

Spartina pectinata

Cephalanthus occidentalis

Taxodium distichum

 

 

 

 

More Privacy Screening Questions

Plants for pool area in Fort Worth
April 20, 2010 - We have a new pool in our backyard, and now also quite a bit of bare land to go with it. Looking for native grass suggestions and also shrubs/trees that I can plant around the pool area for privacy an...
view the full question and answer

Need trees to screen view of parking garage in Houston, TX.
December 29, 2011 - We live in Houston, TX with a beautiful lot except a 4 story parking garage has been built behind us. How can we screen this and the lights out of site. It looks terrible from the second story espec...
view the full question and answer

Privacy screen for pool in Round Rock, TX
February 09, 2009 - We have a pool in our backyard and neighbors quite close on both sides. There is only a cedar fence between yards and we are desperate for some privacy! We are looking for a fast grower that will gr...
view the full question and answer

Small trees for property edge in Katy TX
April 16, 2012 - By deed restriction, I must have five trees on the side of my small suburban lot just west of Houston, TX. Due to the lot layout, the trunks are only about 8-10 feet from the house, with the trees abo...
view the full question and answer

Neat and tidy, poolside in Austin Texas.
December 01, 2010 - I have a small section between our pool and fence (approx 3 feet wide). I would like to plant something native that obscures the fence but does not create a mess for the pool. The area gets sun most...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center