En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Saturday - September 20, 2008

From: Wimberley, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: Poverty Weed in Wimberley, Texas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have seen differing reports about the native plant, Baccharis neglecta or Poverty Weed. Some reports say it is invasive and others consider it an acceptable native plant. I have quite a few Poverty Weed plants on my property and would like your opinion about whether to leave it or remove it.

ANSWER:

An invasive or a weed is in the eye of the beholder, isn't it? Baccharis neglecta (Rooseveltweed) is not only not on the Texas Invasives List, but is considered a native alternative to invasives Elaegnus angustifolia (Russian olive) and Elaegnus umbellata (autumn olive). We kind of like it, it's open and lacy-looking, can survive on little water and a lot of sun, and is considered a good nectar plant for pollinators, including butterflies. We think it has more to do with what type of landscaping you're talking about. If it's out in a large field, it would seem to be a pleasant plant to take up some of the room. Perhaps in a small urban garden it would be a little overwhelming, and you would need to be militant in pulling up sprouts, so you didn't get a Poverty Weed forest. If you live close to property occupied by people who don't like it, you might want to trim the flowers off as soon as they have finished blooming, and before they set seed. And we probably wouldn't go to a nursery and buy one to plant-probably couldn't even find one, but if you have them volunteering, and like them, go for it.


Baccharis neglecta

Baccharis neglecta

Baccharis neglecta

Baccharis neglecta

 

 

 

More Invasive Plants Questions

Identity of plant in Kentucky with fuzzy grayish-green leaves
September 03, 2012 - I would like to know about a plant that I do not know what it is. I had this plant just come up in my flowerbed, that looked like a tobacco plant but the leaves looked like a lambs ear plant. It was ...
view the full question and answer

Native turf grass for Austin
March 24, 2014 - I am installing a xeriscape landscape in my yard. It will be in full sun and I am looking for an alternative to turf, such as monkey grass. However, I am concerned about the light. Suggestions?
view the full question and answer

Absence of grass around a willow tree in Georgia
December 22, 2008 - In the past three years my Willow tree has grown from a stick to a lovely tree. Unfortunately, the grass under and around the tree is gone. Nothing left but dirt. Is there a remedy?
view the full question and answer

Native replacement for bamboo from Houston
May 21, 2013 - I've read one reply where you do not advise using Bamboo as a privacy fence plant. What do you suggest in its place? The suggestions on the one I read will not work for me. Your suggestions were My...
view the full question and answer

Something to grow under a chinaberry tree
August 29, 2008 - I have a huge Chinaberry on the west side of the house. We enjoy the shade it provides and have it limbed up pretty high, but it's located between two 2-story houses and of course drops buckets of it...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center