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Tuesday - September 23, 2008

From: Vista, CA
Region: California
Topic: Erosion Control
Title: Groundcover for erosion control
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live in southern california. What is the best groundcover to plant on a slope to prevent erosion?

ANSWER:

Grasses, with their dense fibrous root systems, are one of the best plants to use for erosion control.  Here are a few suggested grasses for southern California:

Achnatherum hymenoides (Indian ricegrass)

Festuca californica (California fescue)

Koeleria macrantha (prairie Junegrass)

Melica imperfecta (smallflower melicgrass)

Sporobolus airoides (alkali sacaton) and more information

Here are some low-growing shrubs that could be used as groundcovers.  These could be used along with the grasses or instead of the grasses.  Their height is generally 1 to 3 ft.

Symphoricarpos mollis (creeping snowberry) with more information.  This is low-growing shrub that is generally less than 2 feet tall.

Encelia farinosa (brittlebush) with more photos and information

Eriogonum fasciculatum (Eastern Mojave buckwheat) with more information

Mahonia repens (creeping barberry) with more information


Achnatherum hymenoides

Festuca californica

Koeleria macrantha

Melica imperfecta

Sporobolus airoides

Symphoricarpos mollis

Encelia farinosa

Eriogonum fasciculatum

Mahonia repens

 

 

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