Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Sunday - September 14, 2008

From: Asheville, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Vines
Title: Vines for arbor in North Carolina
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Please identify vines that can be used for an arbor that fronts my garage and a portion of the house. Living in Zone 6, the arbor faces southwest. My interest is that the vine be non-invasive because the footing is in a flower garden and that the vine not exceed 20' so that it does not overgrow the roof of the house. Thank you!

ANSWER:

You can view vines that are native to North Carolina by doing a Combination Search in our Native Plant Database and choosing North Carolina from the "Select State or Province" option and then selecting 'Vine' from the "Habit (general appearance)" option.

As with most vines, you will need to monitor the one you choose  to keep it from climbing where you don't want it to go.

Here are a few recommendations from the list of North Carolina vines:

Bignonia capreolata (crossvine)

Clematis crispa (swamp leather flower)

Clematis virginiana (devil's darning needles)

Gelsemium sempervirens (evening trumpetflower)

Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle)

Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper)

Wisteria frutescens (American wisteria)


Bignonia capreolata

Clematis crispa

Clematis virginiana

Gelsemium sempervirens

Lonicera sempervirens

Passiflora incarnata

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Wisteria frutescens

 

 

More Vines Questions

How to graft muscadines?
June 07, 2013 - I have tried for the last two years, grafting my perfect muscadines to the native non-bearing vines. I have tried every method available to no avail. I usually get two or three leaves, then wilt and...
view the full question and answer

Identification of vine with large leaves and blue-black berries
January 15, 2013 - I visited a creek with a limestone seep spring that supplies it. Around the creek is growing some kind plant that has leaves that are very similar to a briar, or snailseed. However, the leaves of the ...
view the full question and answer

Vines for an arbor
November 02, 2012 - We're building an arbor in a 9 1/2 x 12-ft area on the south side of an urban lot. It's bordered by two-story buildings on the south and west and has a tall,sparsely leaved pecan tree on its northea...
view the full question and answer

Identification of vine with gourd-like fruit
June 30, 2010 - We live on a farm, and I have noticed a vine that has leaves like grapes, but produces this flower, and a fruit that is rather large, shaped like a gourd, right now green in color. It is growing over ...
view the full question and answer

Is Bignonia capreolata (Crossvine) known to cause skin irritation
July 23, 2013 - Is Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata L.) known to cause a rash? We are trying to identify the source of a rash-after-gardening, and have not seen any of the big three (poison ivy, poison oak, poison suma...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.