En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - February 17, 2005

From: Dallas, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Potential danger of oak wilt in live oaks in Dallas, TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Do you have or know of any recent publications that discuss a potential oak wilt problem in live oaks in the Dallas area? We strongly believe that live oaks have a great landscape value and are trying to confirm that the risk of oak wilt in newly planted trees is rather low or relatively easy to take care of.

ANSWER:

The Oak Wilt Information Partnership is a collaboration between the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, the Texas Forest Service and the Central Southwest/Gulf Coast Information Node of the National Biological Information Infrastructure. The Partnership tracks and provides information about oak wilt in Texas. Their web page provides a wealth of information on occurrence, treatment, and prevention of oak wilt. The Texas Forest Service notes that recent transplants of live oaks do not quickly establish root connections with the residual root systems of diseased trees, but there is still that risk. If you were thinking of using liveoaks in your landscaping project, the Texas Forest Service offers suggestions for substitutes that are resistant to oak wilt. Two of the substitute oaks on the recommended species list for North Central Texas are: 1) Bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa), and 2) Chinkapin oak (Q. muhlenbergii).
 

More Trees Questions

Determination of native plants of North Carolina
April 24, 2006 - I am compiling lists of native plants to use in NC, and found that Dirr (Manual of Woody Landscape Plants) lists introduction dates (xxxx) for MANY of the trees you list as natives, e.g., Acer rubrum ...
view the full question and answer

Rocky Mountain Juniper Grazed by Deer
April 29, 2013 - I have four Colorado red cedar (Juniperus scopulorum). The deer have eaten from their height down. Now these narrow top to bottom evergreens have only tops left. Will the bottom fill in if I protect t...
view the full question and answer

Adjustments to soil level change around tree from Austin
May 29, 2014 - I am moving in to a new construction home in south Austin, builder has leveled the ground and sodded the front yard, I have a post oak in the front and because of the changes to the landscape the tree...
view the full question and answer

Is any part of Mountain Laurel poisonous to goats from Belton TX
May 02, 2013 - We are considering planting Mountain Laurel in a field where we keep goats. Will any part of the Mountain Laurel be poisonous if eaten by the goats? If it would be poisonous, could you suggest some o...
view the full question and answer

Why are the eastern red cedars in Bastrop/Travis County turning brown?
May 11, 2009 - I live on the Bastrop/Travis county, TX line and have many eastern red cedars on my property. About 10 of them are dying and it has happened quickly with the onset of the warmer weather. I noticed d...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center