En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?


Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - July 15, 2008

From: New Boston, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Is Tagetes lemmonii a Texas native?
Answered by: Barbara Medford and Joe Marcus


Is the Copper Canyon Daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) a native Texas plant?


The USDA Plant Profile shows it as native only to southern Arizona. The City of Austin Native and Adapted Landscape Plants shows it as Non-native, adapted to Austin. It apparently occurs naturally between 4000' and 8000' of altitude in mountain canyons in northern Mexico and southern Arizona. "Vascular Plants of Texas:  a Comprehensive Checklist including synonymy, Bibliography, and Index" by Stanley D. Jones, Joseph K. Wipff and Paul M. Montgomery.  University of Texas Press, 1997, lists it as "Cultivated" in Texas.  Turner, B. L. et al in "Atlas of the Vascular Plants of Texas" list only Tagetes micrantha as does Correll and Johnson "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas".  The term "Copper Canyon" in the common name refers to a region of Mexico in the species' native range. Bottom line: no, it is not a native of Texas.


More Plant Identification Questions

Plant Identification
June 07, 2009 - Having great difficulty identifying a perennial plant. Although it looks marvelous (coming in two shades), I haven't been able to correctly identify it. Local college feels it is Eupatorium Rugosum, ...
view the full question and answer

Fringe tree appropriate for Libertyville IL
July 05, 2009 - I live in Libertyville Illinois and admired a fringe tree on the Biltmore Estate. Are the weather & soil conditions conducive to having a fringe tree in this area?
view the full question and answer

What is the correct genus name for Fringe flower in North Myrtle Beach, SC?
September 14, 2010 - Is it Laura Pedlum or lorapetalum? I saw this shrub last week, and finally found a picture of it. The search engine listed about three different names for it! So what is the correct name, and does i...
view the full question and answer

Cinnamon scented plant growing along Pennsylvania rivers
August 05, 2013 - I've walked along both the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers around my hometown and I've noticed moments at which time I would smell the strong, sweet aroma of cinnamon. Given the riverside envir...
view the full question and answer

Identification of alien-looking plant
June 06, 2013 - I have a plant that grows 4-5 feet tall, it has pretty "alien looking" flowers with "pods" under flower, and marijuana looking leaves and smell. My neighbor gave me a start last year, and it has ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.


Atlas of the Vascular Plants of Texas (2003) Turner, B. L.; H. Nichols; G. Denny; O. Doron

Vascular Plants of Texas (1997) Jones, Wipff, and Montgomery

Search More Titles in Bibliography

© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center