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Tuesday - July 08, 2008

From: Point, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Trees
Title: Non-flowering mimosas in Texas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have two mimosa trees, about 3 years old. Both were grown from volunteer seedlings. Neither have flowers nor have they produced seed pods. Are they too young or do they need a source of pollenation?

ANSWER:

Although the mimosa attracts hummingbirds, pollenation from another tree is not necessary. They are fast-growing, but apparently 3 years old from seed is not old enough to begin to flower. So, you still have time to decide if you really want this tree in your garden. It is non-native to North America, originating from Iran to Japan. It is widely considered an invasive, reproducing both vegetatively and from seed, with the seeds capable of surviving in the soil for many years before germinating. We have two sites below that will give you some information about the mimosa, and then discourage you from planting or growing it. Once it begins to bloom, followed by seed, you will have constant litter in your yard, with seedlings popping up everywhere, including your neighbors' yards, where they may not be wanted. Although they are fast growing, they are short-lived, usually not living beyond 10 to 20 years, but they can leave behind a legacy of unwanted, messy plants all over your area. They have weak wood, and are easily broken down by storms. Did we mention that we really didn't think this was a good tree?

University of Florida Extension Albizia julibrissin

Plant Conservation Alliance Least Wanted Plant

 

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