En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - July 08, 2008

From: Point, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Trees
Title: Non-flowering mimosas in Texas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have two mimosa trees, about 3 years old. Both were grown from volunteer seedlings. Neither have flowers nor have they produced seed pods. Are they too young or do they need a source of pollenation?

ANSWER:

Although the mimosa attracts hummingbirds, pollenation from another tree is not necessary. They are fast-growing, but apparently 3 years old from seed is not old enough to begin to flower. So, you still have time to decide if you really want this tree in your garden. It is non-native to North America, originating from Iran to Japan. It is widely considered an invasive, reproducing both vegetatively and from seed, with the seeds capable of surviving in the soil for many years before germinating. We have two sites below that will give you some information about the mimosa, and then discourage you from planting or growing it. Once it begins to bloom, followed by seed, you will have constant litter in your yard, with seedlings popping up everywhere, including your neighbors' yards, where they may not be wanted. Although they are fast growing, they are short-lived, usually not living beyond 10 to 20 years, but they can leave behind a legacy of unwanted, messy plants all over your area. They have weak wood, and are easily broken down by storms. Did we mention that we really didn't think this was a good tree?

University of Florida Extension Albizia julibrissin

Plant Conservation Alliance Least Wanted Plant

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Can trimmings from non-native globe willows be planted from Broken Arrow OK?
June 13, 2010 - We have 2 globe willow trees in our back yard. We trim low hanging branches. Can we take these cut branches, -plant them and have it grow into a new globe willow tree?
view the full question and answer

Problems with non-native parsley from Brooklyn NY
June 17, 2012 - Had beautiful flat leaf parsley plants recently turn yellow & die. Found black armadillo like bugs bored throughout the roots. Now they're spreading. How do I kill them without contaminating the pla...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting of non-native Vitex
April 29, 2006 - I live in El Paso and have a fifteen year old vitex tree planted too close to a mesquite tree in my backyard. As a result of this, the vitex has failed to thrive. My question is this: can I replant ...
view the full question and answer

Dying branches on non-native buddleias in Horseshoe Bend TX
September 19, 2010 - Our Black Knight buddleias are developing branches that die. The leaves just turn brown and the whole branch dies then another and finally the whole plant dies. Do you know what could be causing this...
view the full question and answer

Alternate native plants for bamboo as a privacy screen in Austin, TX.
July 26, 2011 - Can you recommend a bamboo that I can plant, acting as a privacy screen, reaching at least 10'-12'? We are looking for a bamboo that does not spread, and can take the afternoon sun. It will be pla...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center