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Tuesday - July 08, 2008

From: Ontario, Canada
Region: Canada
Topic: Trees
Title: Propagation of maple tree in Canada
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a gorgeous maple tree in my front lawn and I want to plant more like it. The tree gives off very few keys a year so I want to make sure this works. How do I go about planting a maple key?

ANSWER:

There are several different species of maple (Acer spp.) in Ontario so I am not sure which one you have. Here is information about each of the species and their propagation protocols. Your best bet is to plant the seeds in containers and then transplant the seedlings to the ground after it has thawed sufficiently in the spring.

Acer pensylvanicum (striped maple) with propagation protocol from Native Plant Network and more information from Plants for a Future

Acer rubrum (red maple) with propagation protocol from the Native Plant Network and more information from Plants for a Future

Acer saccharum (sugar maple) with propagation protocol from the Native Plant Network and more information from Plants for a Future

Acer spicatum (mountain maple) with propagation protocol from Plants for a Future

Acer nigrum (black maple) with more information from Plants for a Future

Acer negundo (boxelder) with plant propagation protocol form the Native Plant Network and more information from Plants for a Future

You can see more information about germinating Acer sp. seeds at Tree/Shrub Seed Germination by Tom Clothier.

 

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