En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - July 04, 2008

From: Arcadia, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Cold hardy non-native fig tree for Dallas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Do you know the best cold hardy fig tree that will grow and fruit in Dallas, Texas?

ANSWER:

Since Ficus carica is not a native of North America, we have no information on it in our Native Plant Database. We did, however, find an excellent website Fig Fruit Facts Ficus carica. This site even includes a list of cultivars. The fig is indigenous to western Asia and grows best and produces best-quality figs in the Meditteranean and dryer, warmer-temperature climates.

This Florida site Ficus carica lists some cold-hardy specimens by cultivar name. The fig is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 8 to 10. Dallas is about Zone 7a. With winter protection, can be grown as far north as Zone 5. When fully dormant, fig trees can tolerate temperatures as low as 10 deg to 15 deg F. Even if frozen, figs often will resprout from roots and produce a crop the following summer. For Dallas, do not order or purchase any fig trees that are specifically California cultivars, as they are pollinated by a tiny wasp that cannot survive the weather in Texas.

 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Rose care for Austin
August 18, 2013 - I am a transplant from the Pacific NW and need to relearn rose care for Austin. When is the best time to cut back the roses, or do I even bother? I also need to find out how far back I can trimming a...
view the full question and answer

Seeds and seed pods of bluejacket (Tradescantia ohiensis or Hyacinthus orientalis
March 26, 2015 - I have lots of bluejacket flowers in my yard. I keep looking for the seed pods but can't find any seeds. Where are the seed pods located on the bluejacket flower? Thanks. Lew Dallas
view the full question and answer

Invasive nature of non-native Zoysia japonica grass
April 22, 2007 - I have been reading up on Zoysia grass and I am curious about its invasive nature. Is there a good way to keep it from going into my neighbors' yards? I was thinking about using some edging material...
view the full question and answer

Removing a non-native windmill palm from Austin
February 27, 2013 - I have a fairly good size windmill palm (about 15ft high) that is planted too close to the house. I also don't like having to constantly remove its fronds as they block a walkway. Is there a good wa...
view the full question and answer

Acre-scale Grass Removal near Austin, TX
July 04, 2014 - How do I get rid of 10 acres of Kleingrass?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center