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Thursday - July 03, 2008

From: Portland, OR
Region: Northwest
Topic: Shrubs, Vines
Title: Plants for wall with afternoon sun in Oregon
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Portland, Or. We have a stacked cement wall about 30 feet long that receives afternoon sun from the west. we would like to plant something edible along that wall that can tolerate afternoon sun. Grapes? berries? Do you know what would like those conditions? Thanks Emily

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants is assuming you are looking for a vine that will trail down the wall. Here are some possibilities that will grow in sun, part shade and shade.

There are two grapes native to Oregon:

Vitis californica (California wild grape) and photos and more information

Vitis riparia (riverbank grape) This is probably the most widespread grape in North America. Here are photos and more information.

If you would like some vines without edible fruit, honeysuckles are a good choice:

Lonicera ciliosa (orange honeysuckle)

Lonicera hispidula (pink honeysuckle)

There are 12 different kinds of berries of the genus Rubus (blackberry, raspberry, salmonberry, thimbleberry) that are native to Oregon. You can see these 12 by clicking on the "Narrow Your Search" option on the page with the list of Rubus species and choosing 'Oregon' from the list under "Select State or Province". Here are a few selections from these. Some are considered vines and some aren't really considered vines, but would probably drape over the wall:

Rubus leucodermis (whitebark raspberry) with photos and more information

Rubus ursinus (California blackberry) and photos and more information

Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus (grayleaf red raspberry)

Rubus spectabilis (salmonberry) and more information


Lonicera ciliosa

Lonicera hispidula

Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus

Rubus spectabilis

 

 

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