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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Tuesday - June 24, 2008

From: Charlotte, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Plants to put beside driveway
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a 100 foot dying grassy side to my driveway. It is about 5 foot wide. What could I plant that would not look like soldiers but be at least 4 foot high and I could use mulch or needles to beautify?

ANSWER:

Here are some suggestions from our Recommended Species for North Carolina list of native species that are commercially available for landscaping solutions. These have varied shapes and textures and could be mixed for even more variety. You can find more shrubs from the above list by choosing the Narrow Your Search option and select 'Shrub' from the Habit (general appearance) category.

Comptonia peregrina (sweet fern)

Erythrina herbacea (coralbean)

Hypericum prolificum (shrubby St. Johnswort)

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle) This species is evergreen and there are dwarf cultivars available.

Physocarpus opulifolius (common ninebark)

Rhus aromatica (fragrant sumac)

Symphoricarpos orbiculatus (coralberry)


Comptonia peregrina

Erythrina herbacea

Hypericum prolificum

Morella cerifera

Physocarpus opulifolius

Rhus aromatica

Symphoricarpos orbiculatus

 

 

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