En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - April 30, 2008

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pollinators
Title: Blue-green bees
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Over a month ago I sent this query to the AAS Garden Editor. What a waste of time since she exhibited no knowledge and no interest. Finally, she told me to ask you about the green bees that came by in early March. At the time, I wrote that I had noticed that my mountain laurel blooms were attracting blue-green honeybees. They are a dark bottle green on top and golden tan on the bottom, from head to stinger. They don't look like the metallic green bees you find online. I have several clear digital pictures I would be glad to send. I am wondering about these green bees, since friends and neighbors have never seen them. Are you aware of them, or do you have any information about them? --OLC

ANSWER:

Since we do not recognize your bee from the description you've given us, we are going to suggest that you talk to some real experts on insect identification. Bugguide.net is a great resource for identifying insects. Here is a link to their web page for insect ID requests of unidentified species. You can also browse their bee pages if you wish to search for the insect's name on your own. Be aware, though, that many insects, including some flies, moths and beetles, mimic bees - often to a remarkable degree.

 

More Pollinators Questions

Pollinator plants for Ilex verticillata (winterberry)
June 09, 2008 - How close do a male and female common winterberry need to be to produce berries. We bought a male and female last year and attracted cedar wax wings. Amazing show. We just bought two more females a...
view the full question and answer

Zucchini blooms but no fruit
August 26, 2008 - My zuchinni has lots of flowers, but they seem to fall and I am getting no fruit.. WHY
view the full question and answer

Compact possumhaw holly for Plano TX
April 19, 2010 - What variety of possumhaw holly would be best planted close to a house? I'm looking for a variety 15-25 feet, as compact as possible. Any suggestions?
view the full question and answer

Live oak trees buzzing in Taylor TX
October 20, 2012 - Is it possible for live oak trees to make a buzzing sound? We have heard this sound under our live oak and were worried it was bees but we don't seem to see any. I also heard the buzzing under my mot...
view the full question and answer

Artist's project on protecting pollinators in Austin
February 26, 2011 - I am designing a citywide artist's project to protect and preserve local, natural pollinators (with an emphasis on honeybees). What nectar-rich plants would you recommend for this type of project? ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center