En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Blue-green bees

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - April 30, 2008

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pollinators
Title: Blue-green bees
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Over a month ago I sent this query to the AAS Garden Editor. What a waste of time since she exhibited no knowledge and no interest. Finally, she told me to ask you about the green bees that came by in early March. At the time, I wrote that I had noticed that my mountain laurel blooms were attracting blue-green honeybees. They are a dark bottle green on top and golden tan on the bottom, from head to stinger. They don't look like the metallic green bees you find online. I have several clear digital pictures I would be glad to send. I am wondering about these green bees, since friends and neighbors have never seen them. Are you aware of them, or do you have any information about them? --OLC

ANSWER:

Since we do not recognize your bee from the description you've given us, we are going to suggest that you talk to some real experts on insect identification. Bugguide.net is a great resource for identifying insects. Here is a link to their web page for insect ID requests of unidentified species. You can also browse their bee pages if you wish to search for the insect's name on your own. Be aware, though, that many insects, including some flies, moths and beetles, mimic bees - often to a remarkable degree.

 

More Pollinators Questions

Bees knees squeezing
May 28, 2010 - Barbara, Do the knees of bees help them squeeze if they please their wobbly, bobbly, knobbly balls of pollen?
view the full question and answer

Getting milkweed seeds into seed mixes from Milwaukee WI
February 07, 2014 - My husband and I are concerned about the Monarch butterfly migration and have started an effort to get milkweed planted along some bike trails here in Wisconsin. This made me think of Ladybird Johnso...
view the full question and answer

Artist's project on protecting pollinators in Austin
February 26, 2011 - I am designing a citywide artist's project to protect and preserve local, natural pollinators (with an emphasis on honeybees). What nectar-rich plants would you recommend for this type of project? ...
view the full question and answer

Shrubby options for a bird lover in New Jersey
September 07, 2011 - Could you please recommend a native shrub to NJ that grows to about 3-4 feet, is very low maintenance, does well in afternoon sun and is also something the birds will like? Thank you.
view the full question and answer

Effect on taste of honey from pollen gathered by honeybees in Appleton WI
March 09, 2014 - in the flower box.. We are planting perennial or self-planting annuals on our fields and open areas to feed honey bees for our apiary. We found a source and then lost it telling what effect these wil...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center