En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - May 01, 2008

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Privacy Screening
Title: Evergreen shrubs for screen
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I'd like your recommendation for an evergreen shrub (flowers would be a nice bonus but not as necessary as the evergreen factor) or small tree with a height hopefully under 12' and a width hopefully less than 3' or 4'. This is to help with the view out our living room windows which look out at our neighbors red brick. The shrubs or small trees would be planted on the northern exposure side of the house. There is some sunlight when the sun is high up, but not direct - there are no other trees on that side providing any shade. I'm thinking a yew, evergreen sumac, nandina, dwarf wax myrtle or some type of virburnum. Thanks for the help!

ANSWER:

Here are some evergreen native shrubs/small trees that should do well in partial shade and have attractive flowers and/or berries.

Rhus virens (evergreen sumac)—flowers and berries

Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain-laurel)—great flowers

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon)—small flowers, but beautiful red berries

Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas cenizo)—great purple flowers that bloom after rains at various times of year

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle)—berries for birds

Prunus caroliniana (Carolina laurelcherry)—flowers and berries

As far as I know, there are no Viburnum species native to Texas that are evergreen.

There are no yew trees native to Texas.

Please don't use Nandina domestica—it is not native and is listed on the TexasInvasives.org web site.


Rhus virens

Sophora secundiflora

Ilex vomitoria

Leucophyllum frutescens

Morella cerifera

Prunus caroliniana

 

 

More Privacy Screening Questions

Drought tolerant privacy plants for Flagstaff AZ
March 19, 2013 - We need a fast growing drought tolerant tree that will grow in Flagstaff AZ/Parks AZ. Neighbors are hoarders and we want privacy fence to cover the mess. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
view the full question and answer

Hedgerow plants non-toxic to horses
April 07, 2012 - What would be a good, fast growing, hedgerow plant that is NON-POISONOUS TO HORSES? Thank you.
view the full question and answer

New York State Shrubs to Screen Home from Traffic
March 11, 2010 - I am looking for a native New York bush/small tree which I can use along a road to screen my home from year-round car traffic. The area is not terribly wide and the soil is OK. I am willing to prune a...
view the full question and answer

Need plants to provide a privacy screen in Cedar Creek, TX
March 31, 2015 - We need to screen out neighbor's house. What can we plant (fast growing tree or hedge) in partial shade? Area is dry in summer, but does get soggy during heavy rain. We live east of Austin in Cedar C...
view the full question and answer

Hedge to cover chain link fence
September 04, 2010 - Hi, I would like to hide 250 feet of 6' tall chain link fence on a western facing, sloped, very rocky soiled back yard I had to use a jack hammer to dig the holes. Esthetically I would like to be abl...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center