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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Saturday - April 19, 2008

From: KELLER, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Possibility of using weeping love grass on property in Keller, Texas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What do you know about "Weeping Love Grass"? We have heard that it does not require watering (once the roots are established, fertilizing, nor frequent mowing. So we decided to plant it on our 2-acre property interspersed with dry creek beds to control the flow of rainwater across the property. We also are using many drought tolerant plants, trees, and shrubs. We hope to be able to enjoy our yard without becoming a slave to its care.

ANSWER:

We recently answered another question on this grass, please read this previous answer, which is also from Keller, Texas. Note from that answer that there are a number of native grasses that could be planted instead of this grass, and would serve the same purpose. At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, we try to encourage the use of plants native to North America, because native plants are well adapted to their environment, thus requiring less water, fertilizer, maintenance, etc. which is what you are looking for.

 

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