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Sunday - March 30, 2008

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Source for non-native, invasive Chocolate Mimosa
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Hi, I was wondering if you know where I can get seeds for a Chocolate Mimosa Tree? I saw one and I fell in love with the colors but I can not find any seeds or a tree.

ANSWER:

Sorry, but no. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the care and propagation of plants native to North America. Albizia julibrissin (mimosa, silk tree) is a native of Asia from Iran east to China and Korea. Cultivar "Chocolate Mimosa" was developed in Japan and begun recently being imported into the United States. Not only is the mimosa a non-native, but it is on many invasives list; that is, native plant people not only don't recommend you plant it, they recommend you remove it if you've already planted it. See this website from the Plant Conservation Alliance on "Least Wanted" mimosa. So, our usual native plant suppliers and seed sources would definitely not have this plant in their inventory. See this list of alternatives to the non-native mimosa in our Plantwise: Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants.

 

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