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Thursday - March 27, 2008

From: RALEIGH , NC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Wildlife Gardens
Title: Host plant for butterflies in North Carolina
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What is the best host plant for butterflies in North Carolina?

ANSWER:

Begin by reading our "How To" article on Butterfly Gardening. Near the end of the article, seven plants native to North America are listed as good attractors of butterflies. Of these, Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed), Monarda didyma (scarlet beebalm), and Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan) all can be found growing naturally in North Carolina. Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed) is a personal favorite, as a nectar source, food for butterfly larvae and really bright and lovely flowers.


Asclepias tuberosa

Monarda didyma

Rudbeckia hirta

 

 

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