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Sunday - March 23, 2008

From: Carlsbad, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Source for purchase of Texas Madrone
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Where can we buy a Texas Madrone, the Peeling Tree, or Naked Indian tree?

ANSWER:

When we get a question on how to obtain a plant, we try to first check and see if that plant will grow in the area where the gardener lives. We really hate to recommend desert plants to someone living in a very wet or cool area, because we know there is built-in failure there. However, this USDA Plant Profile shows that the Arbutus xalapensis (Texas madrone) is already present in the Carlsbad. NM area. Also, we found out that, in New Mexico, the Madrone preferred altitudes of 2000 to 6000 feet; since the altitude of Carlsbad is approximately 4000 feet, it looks like you qualify all the way around.

One of the beauties of the Madrone is its exfoliating bark. When the older layers slough off, the new bark is smooth and can range from white to orange through shades of apricot to dark red; thus, the common names of Peeling Bark Tree, Lady's Legs, and Naked Indian.

We found a previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer to your question on where to purchase the Texas Madrone. There is also some good information in that answer on the difficulties of propagating the Madrone. We checked the link to Natives of Texas Nursery and it is still good. This nursery is in Kerrville, TX and they specialize in the madrone. We checked our Native Plant Suppliers and searched on New Mexico, which yielded this list of nurseries in your state. Whether any of them would be more convenient to you than Kerrville, we don't know.


Arbutus xalapensis

Arbutus xalapensis

Arbutus xalapensis

Arbutus xalapensis

 

 

 

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