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Thursday - February 14, 2008

From: Mohnton, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Source for wildflower seeds of milkweed family (Asclepiadaceae)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am a lifelong amateur botanist/horticulturist and am trying to find a source for wild flower seeds of the milkweed family (Asclepiadacea). Thanks.

ANSWER:

There are a couple of approaches for finding seeds of milkweeds (Family Asclepiadaceae). Go to our Native Plant Database and select Asclepiadaceae (Milkweed Family) from the Family list. You can scroll through the 52 species that we have listed and look for those that have an entry under the Find Seed category. This will take you to the Native Seed Network for sources that have seeds for the species in question. Below are some of the species that have a link to the Native Seed Network:

Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed)

Asclepias fascicularis (Mexican whorled milkweed)

Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed)

Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed)

Asclepias viridis (green antelopehorn)

You can also check our Native Suppliers Directory for nurseries and seed companies in your area that specialize in native plants. For instance, Ernst Conservation Seeds in Meadville, PA lists A. incarnata, A. syriaca, and A. tuberosa for sale.


Asclepias incarnata

Asclepias syriaca

Asclepias tuberosa

 

 

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