En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - February 03, 2008

From: Taylor, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Disease-resistant squash varieties for Central Texas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Can you give me names of some disease-resistant summer squash varieties available in Central Texas?

ANSWER:

At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center we don't ordinarily deal with vegetables, as most of them are non-native. However, archeological evidence suggests that squash may have been first cultivated in Mesoamerica some 8,000 to 10,000 years ago. Therefore, it would appear that summer squash, Cucurbita pepo, is VERY native, having been raised by early Native Americans. However, like most of the vegetables being grown today, squash is so extensively hybridized that it does fall out of the Wildflowers Center's usual expertise, and we have no information on vegetables on our Native Plant Database. We went a little further afield to see if we could help you. This Cornell University website, "Yellow Summer Squash: Disease Resistance Table" on the various problems with squash and varieties that are resistant to those problems should at least give you a start. This table also has codes for various seed companies that supply the strains of squash, and you can probably go online, find what you want and order seeds. More general information on raising summer squash, with additional information on diseases and pests that attack squash, is on this UC Davis Vegetable Research and Information Center website.

 

More Herbs/Forbs Questions

Grass for Seattle Arboretum
May 20, 2012 - I am writing to you on behalf of the Arboretum at South Seattle Community College Arboretum. I am interested in Panicum virgatum Switch Grass as a plant for a very heavy clay garden in our Arboretum a...
view the full question and answer

Landscaping on South Padre Island
June 07, 2008 - I'm in charge of landscaping at my beachfront condo in South Padre Island and find the wind, salt air, and heat challenging for growing almost anything. We would like to incorporate native plants, b...
view the full question and answer

Blackfoot daisy declining in Austin
September 04, 2010 - My Blackfoot Daisies have grown large, bushy, have bloomed well over the past two summers. Now parts of the plants are drying up, dying. Will pruning out the dead parts help the plants to survive, or ...
view the full question and answer

Plants for underneath oak tree
October 10, 2012 - I have a North facing wall of my house that gets half sunlight half shade depending on the season. I would like to layout some native South Texas plants and complete fill in area to prevent the live o...
view the full question and answer

Deer resistant plants for area under grand fir (Abies grandis) in Idaho
July 08, 2010 - What can I plant on a slope under Grand Fir trees in North Idaho, zone 4 - anything deer resistant?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center