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Sunday - February 03, 2008

From: Lexington, SC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Propagation, Transplants, Cacti and Succulents
Title: Possibility of growing Buckleys yucca in South Carolina
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live in Lexington, SC. I am wondering if I can grow Buckley's yucca (yucca constricta) here and if so, where can I purchase the seeds or plants? I am from Texas and we are trying to create a "western-themed" garden...and my first name is Buckley, as well! Sounds like a great plant for us, but did not know whether it is available or even practical. Thanks

ANSWER:

Yucca constricta (Buckley's yucca) is, in the United States, native only to Texas, according to the USDA Plants Profile. It also is very difficult to transplant, even as a very young plant, and it is recommended that it be grown from seed or container-grown plants. It is cold tolerant, but that means cold tolerant for its native area, which is mostly Zones 8-9. We went to our Plant Suppliers Directory and searched on "Yucca constricta" and South Carolina, but got no results. Frankly, it doesn't sound like a very practical plant to attempt to grow in your garden, but if you can find a mail order seed supplier, you might be able to plant a few in containers, grow them to a size that can be planted in the ground, and give it a try. And, of course, having a plant named after you is pretty cool, and could well be worth pursuing.


Yucca constricta

 

 

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