Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - February 03, 2008

From: Lexington, SC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Propagation, Transplants, Cacti and Succulents
Title: Possibility of growing Buckleys yucca in South Carolina
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live in Lexington, SC. I am wondering if I can grow Buckley's yucca (yucca constricta) here and if so, where can I purchase the seeds or plants? I am from Texas and we are trying to create a "western-themed" garden...and my first name is Buckley, as well! Sounds like a great plant for us, but did not know whether it is available or even practical. Thanks

ANSWER:

Yucca constricta (Buckley's yucca) is, in the United States, native only to Texas, according to the USDA Plants Profile. It also is very difficult to transplant, even as a very young plant, and it is recommended that it be grown from seed or container-grown plants. It is cold tolerant, but that means cold tolerant for its native area, which is mostly Zones 8-9. We went to our Plant Suppliers Directory and searched on "Yucca constricta" and South Carolina, but got no results. Frankly, it doesn't sound like a very practical plant to attempt to grow in your garden, but if you can find a mail order seed supplier, you might be able to plant a few in containers, grow them to a size that can be planted in the ground, and give it a try. And, of course, having a plant named after you is pretty cool, and could well be worth pursuing.


Yucca constricta

 

 

More Transplants Questions

Hummingbird plants and Indian Hawthorn
May 13, 2008 - I live in The Woodlands in a new section of homes. I planted some hummingbird plants in full sun and they did ok last year for 4 months, then lost all their leaves and died when the winter came. At ...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting native flame leaf sumac in Eden, TX
October 26, 2008 - We have tried without success to transplant a flame leaf sumac from the ranch to the house. What are we doing wrong?
view the full question and answer

Moving a volunteer holly from Springfield IL
October 11, 2010 - When would be the very best time to move a volunteer holly? I would say it is 3 years old, it stands about 5 feet tall, shaped like a very nice tree and it keeps its leaves. Thank you. Karen
view the full question and answer

Problems with Silverado Sage in Pearland, TX.
July 28, 2012 - Hi, We have three Silverado Sage bushes we planted last year. They did great during the drought. However, this winter they had a severed leaf drop of mostly just the centers of them. These cente...
view the full question and answer

Transplant shock of non-native Bougainvillea
May 22, 2008 - Well I bought two Bougainvilleas, the first one I transplanted is doing great, the second one not so good when I was taking it out of the original pot the root ball stayed in the pot but the plant wit...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.