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Saturday - January 05, 2008

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Lists
Title: Plant fans for choosing native plants for the Central Texas region
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Has anyone created a plant "fan" that identifies and gives pertinent information on plants for the Central Texas region? The sample that I've found on fourpebblepress.com seems to cover the Rocky Mountain area for the most part. It would be so handy to have one to carry around while deciding on plants for our soil/heat/water issues here in Austin and in the Hill Country region.


This Flower Fan looks like a very handy device; however, so far as Mr. Smarty Plants has been able to tell, such an aid doesn't exist for Central Texas. There are, however, recommended lists of native plants for the Hill Country. You can find one such list, Central Texas Recommended, on the Wildflower Center web page. You can narrow down this list by characteristics or growing conditions of the plants. The Kerrville Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) also has a list of Native Plants for Landscaping in the Texas Hill Country with their bloom periods, descriptions and cultural requirements.


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