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Mr. Smarty Plants - Vines and shrubs for wildlife cover and food

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Friday - December 14, 2007

From: Breckenridge, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Vines and shrubs for wildlife cover and food
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I own property in Stephens County about 10 miles north of Breckenridge, TX along the Clear Fork of the Brazos River. I have 45 acres that is open field and I want to provide cover and food for wildlife. I want native species only and I would prefer a shrub or vine that can grow along a fenceline to provide a break from the county road. I would appreciate any suggestions you might have for the property.

ANSWER:

The following are vines and shrubs, or small trees, native to your area that offer food and/or shelter for a variety of butterflies, birds, and mammals.

VINES:

Ampelopsis cordata (heartleaf peppervine)

Lonicera albiflora (western white honeysuckle)

Ibervillea lindheimeri (Lindheimer's globeberry)

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper)

SHRUBS/SMALL TREES:

Acacia angustissima (prairie acacia)

Acacia greggii (catclaw acacia)

Rhus glabra (smooth sumac)

Rhus lanceolata (prairie sumac)

Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum)

Prunus gracilis (Oklahoma plum)

Amorpha fruticosa (desert false indigo)

Cornus drummondii (roughleaf dogwood)

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash)

Frangula caroliniana (Carolina buckthorn)

Ziziphus obtusifolia (lotebush)


Ampelopsis cordata

Lonicera albiflora

Ibervillea lindheimeri

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Acacia angustissima

Acacia greggii var. wrightii

Rhus glabra

Rhus lanceolata

Prunus mexicana

Amorpha fruticosa

Cornus drummondii

Fraxinus texensis

Frangula caroliniana

Ziziphus obtusifolia

 

 

 

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