En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - November 02, 2007

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagation of lilies by seed
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have collected a large number of lily seeds. How can I get them to grow?

ANSWER:

We were not sure if you were referring to native or non-native lilies. We learned in our research that many of the lilies that are grown in gardens today are the non-native Asian or Oriental lilies. At the same time, there are a great many lilies native to North America, and since the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to promoting and protecting plants native to North America, we hope that is what you have chosen to raise. When we looked into the Wildflower Center Native Plant Database, typing in "lily" in the plant search field, we got back 134 results, all lilies native to North America. You can look through these, perhaps learn the names of the lilies from which you have harvested seeds, and read the information about where that specific lily is most comfortable growing. Unfortunately, many of the North American native lilies are naturally distributed only in California or the Pacific Northwest. We did discover some that are found in Texas, including Erythronium albidum (white fawnlily), Habranthus tubispathus (Rio Grande copperlily), and Hymenocallis galvestonensis (Galveston spiderlily) .

Apparently, it does not really matter if they are native or not, the planting of lilies by seeds is done much the the same way. Rather than paraphrase already well-written materials, let us direct you to two links on planting lilies from seeds. The first is The Lily Nook, the second is Lilyseeds.com.

 


Erythronium albidum

Habranthus tubispathus

Hymenocallis galvestonensis

 

 

More Propagation Questions

Will my Lisianthus survive the winter in Minnesota for another growing season?
March 09, 2009 - Do you know if Lisianthus plants planted one year, will come back the next year? We bought 6 gorgeous healthy plants last summer from a MN grower. We enjoyed them all last Summer and are wondering if ...
view the full question and answer

Propagation by seed of Texas Mountain Laurel
September 20, 2008 - I just harvested a grocery bag full of Texas Mountain Laurel seed pods. I want to cast them out in a field and wooded area near NW Austin. Is it best to leave the seeds in the pods or remove the pod...
view the full question and answer

Dogwoods cross-pollinating from Snyder, CO
October 24, 2012 - I have a red twig and a yellow twig dogwood. Will they cross-pollinate to produce berries? Thank you
view the full question and answer

Oakleaf hydrangea in Indiana
November 18, 2010 - I was given a start of an oak leaf hydrangea by a generous friend from her garden. I have been searching for "what to expect" about this plant. I planted it last year and it grew..this year..but d...
view the full question and answer

Plants for church gardens in Ft. Worth TX
November 07, 2013 - Second attempt. Our church has many gardens in Fort Worth, TX. There are gardens for blue,red,yellow,white,purple,orange,pink,mixed,community garden,roses, and more. I am interested in the la...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center