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Tuesday - November 06, 2007

From: Franklin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Shrub or small tree for hedgerow to block view
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

For property in the Post Oak Savanah area of Eastern Texas, north of Bryan, Texas, I would like to plant a native hedgerow to block the view of a neighboring property. Ideally this would be a shrub to cover from the ground to a height of about 12-15 feet, and I am hopeful it wouldn't be invasive and create its own set of problems. Do you have suggestions.

ANSWER:

Mr. SP assumes you would like evergreen since you are trying to block a view. Here are 5 possibilities that are native to Robertson County, Texas:

EVERGREENS:

Prunus caroliniana (Carolina laurelcherry), 15-20 feet

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle), 6-20 feet

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon), 12-25 feet

Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), 72-100 feet but can be kept pruned to size

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar) , usually 30-40 feet and can also be kept pruned to size

Here are more choices if you want to consider deciduous shrubs or trees:

DECIDUOUS:

Viburnum rufidulum (rusty blackhaw), up to 18 feet

Viburnum nudum (possumhaw), 12 -20 feet

Frangula caroliniana (Carolina buckthorn), 12-20 feet

Cornus drummondii (roughleaf dogwood), 12-16 feet


Prunus caroliniana

Morella cerifera

Ilex vomitoria

Pinus taeda

Juniperus virginiana

Viburnum rufidulum

Viburnum nudum

Frangula caroliniana

Cornus drummondii

 

 

 

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