En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
2 ratings

Wednesday - October 31, 2007

From: Union Bay, BC
Region: Canada
Topic: Vines
Title: Trumpet vine care
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I planted a trumpet vine in the early summer of this year. It grew about 3-4 ft. and seemed healthy. It is now Oct. 25th, and I just noticed that all the leaves seem to have shrivelled up and gone brown. Hopefully, it's simply gone into dormancy. Should I prune it back yet and, if not, when should I?

ANSWER:

Campsis radicans (trumpet creeper) is a native of North America, although it looks exotic enough and grows fast enough (in the American south) that you might think it a sub-tropical non-native. According to the USDA hardiness map, it is hardy from Zones 4 to 9, and is growing in Washington State. Assuming you are in the more temperate coastal area of British Columbia, you should have no trouble sustaining it. And, you should probably be glad you are there, where colder temperatures will inhibit it somewhat, as it can get out of control, grow 35 to 70 feet, and simply take over (sometimes damaging) buildings, fences and trellises.

The Trumpet creeper is a deciduous plant, and as far north as you are, you should certainly be expecting it to start dropping its leaves by late October. When it has done so, in the fall, is the time to trim it fairly close to the base. If it grows too vigorously during the warm season, you can prune it back just about any time to control growth and open up the foliage. See this Floridata site for more information on the culture of Campsis radicans . One warning: One of the common names for this plant is "cow-itch vine" which refers to the plant's ability to produce a skin irritant.

 


Campsis radicans

 

 

More Vines Questions

Growing native vines in pots from Houston
May 28, 2012 - I am writing in regards to your often mentioned issue of plants not doing as well in pots and in the ground. After last years drought, i moved all the plants I had that were in danger of dying of t...
view the full question and answer

Distinguishing non-native Wisteria from Austin
June 25, 2012 - How do I distinguish a native wisteria from a non-native wisteria?
view the full question and answer

Identify red-flowering vine in E. Texas
April 03, 2009 - Beside a well on an old homestead in Deep East Texas, there is a delicate vine. The leaves are heart shaped with points all the way around. The flower is a bright red trumpet shaped. I saw an angel ...
view the full question and answer

10 year old Wisteria fails to bloom in Rockwall, TX.
May 15, 2013 - I love wisteria. I had four (4) wisteria plants professionally planted at least ten (10) years ago. These wisteria plants have NEVER bloomed. Why not?
view the full question and answer

Invasive mandevilla from Chula Vista CA
December 10, 2012 - How can I rid my yard of mandevilla that has invaded from my neighbor's yard?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center