En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - October 15, 2007

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Transplants, Trees
Title: Newly planted anacacho leaf browning
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have just put my anacacho orchid into the ground and its leaves are turning brown and falling off. Is that normal for this time of year, or have I shocked it? What can I do to ensure its health?

ANSWER:

Bauhinia lunarioides (Texasplume) is native in canyons and arroyos in limestone hills in Kinney, Presidio and Gillespie or Llano counties, which means it's pretty much a desert dweller and needs well drained sand loam limestone. However, it should be all right in Austin, particularly if it is given some afternoon shade and moderate moisture. The problem here, though, may be transplant shock. After an often cool, wet summer, we are now making up for it with July weather in October. Ordinarily, woody plants like this are better planted after the weather has cooled more, perhaps in November. Texas natives are pretty tough; otherwise, they'd never have survived this long. Make sure it has some shelter from afternoon sun, and adequate moisture. On a newly planted specimen, sticking the hose down into the soil around the roots and dribbling a slow stream of water into it for an hour or so a few days a week should help. When a plant starts dropping leaves, it is often a sign of stress, but in this case, it could also be a sign of season. The anacacho orchid is deciduous, and may have decided to go ahead and start losing some leaves. With some extra attention, hopefully it will leaf out and be fine when spring comes.

 


Bauhinia lunarioides

 

 

More Trees Questions

Native trees for cemetery plot in Karnes County, TX
April 08, 2007 - I'm looking for a tree for a cemetery plot in Karnes County at Pana Maria. There will be someone to regularly water it. I understand live oak and pecan are native to the area. I assume these would...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen Trees for Cedar Creek, TX
August 14, 2013 - Hello I am wanting to plant some evergreen trees on my property out in Cedar Creek Texas. We have a lot of cedar trees but I really would like some live oaks. Is it possible to grow live oaks or somet...
view the full question and answer

Planting a tulip poplar in Virginia Beach VA
November 10, 2009 - Hi. I would like to plant a Yellow Poplar, 'Tulip Tree' in my front yard. I will not be able to plant this tree until after November 15th. The tree will receive direct sun and will be exposed to hea...
view the full question and answer

Small Yard Tree for Washington DC
July 20, 2012 - What do you suggest for a tree or shrub in my front yard? The yard is small; 9 ft x 12 ft. Thank you.
view the full question and answer

White fuzz on Christmas tree from Lewisburg PA
January 04, 2011 - Our Canaan fir Christmas tree is now coated with white fuzz after being up for 4 weeks. The fuzz looks like spider webs, but it is also in clumps around the needles. When you rub your finger on it, ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center