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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Tuesday - October 02, 2007

From: Hico, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: plant identification, Portulaca pilosa, Kiss-me-quick
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

There is a small plant with clusters of red-purple flowers and tubular succulent leaves on branching stems I found in the flower boxes at the top of the look-out tower there at the center. I forgot to ask what they were until I found the same thing volunteering itself in a friend's garden. Could I have the botanical name for this plant and is it native?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants knows exactly what plant you are talking about—it is Portulaca pilosa (kiss me quick).  It is native.

 


Portulaca pilosa

Portulaca pilosa

Portulaca pilosa

 

 

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