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Saturday - September 29, 2007

From: Dripping Springs, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Meadow Gardens
Title: Mowing equipment
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My 10 acre property along a creek in N. Hays Co. includes roughly 7 acres that is a woodland / meadow mix. I want to find a mower that I can set to a 6" cutting height, yet anything smaller than a full blown tractor pulling a mowing attachment seems to be capable of a maximum 4 - 4 !/2" cutting height. Do you know of a machine capable of this sized for the small acreage homeowner?

ANSWER:

Sorry, anything that involves internal combustion is way out of our line. For us to research and recommend something like this would basically be equal to recommending a product or manufacturer, which Mr. Smarty Plants and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center do not do. We would suggest you go to any large home improvement store, or even a tractor supply company, look at the possibilities and ask them the question. Obviously, they're going to be trying to sell you their particular product, but that's their job, and you can make your decision based on the information you get. And you could start with an Internet search, just to get a feel for whether such a thing is even manufactured. Good luck on your search, and when you have a question about something with roots, we're here for you.
 

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