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Wednesday - October 03, 2007

From: Round Rock, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Seeds and Seeding
Title: How to sow Eves Necklace seeds.
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have recently acquired some Eve's Necklace seed pods. In order to plant them, do I need to open the pod to get to the seed, or do I just plant the pod? Should I soak or scarify the pod/seed?

ANSWER:

Styphnolobium affine (Eve's necklacepod), which, until recently, was called Sophora affinis, is closely related to Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain-laurel). They have similar seeds that require the same sort of treatment. You do need to remove the seeds from the pod and they will germinate best if you scarify the seeds before planting them. Soaking the seed pods in water will make the hard brown seeds easier to remove from the pods. You can sow them directly in the ground when the soil has warmed in the spring or you could sow them in pots and transplant the seedlings. If you plant them in pots, be sure that the pot is deep enough so that the seedling can develop a reasonably long root for transplanting.

 


Styphnolobium affine

 

 

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