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Sunday - September 16, 2007

From: Kerrville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildlife Gardens
Title: Evergreen plant with berries for wildlife
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We live in central Texas and I am attempting to plant for wildlife. Could you suggest an evergreen, approximately 3-4 feet tall, that would have berries for the birds in the Fall and winter? The plant would get full sun in the afternoon and would be located next to a rock foundation. Thanks

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants can suggest two good candidates:

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon)

and

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle)

Even though their maximum size reaches a little more than your requirements, you can keep them trimmed to size.

Another "evergreen" that you might consider is Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas cenizo). Although it doesn't have berries that are used by birds or mammals, it does have flowers that are attractive to butterflies.


Ilex vomitoria

Morella cerifera

Leucophyllum frutescens

 

 

 

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