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Friday - May 09, 2003

From: Arlington, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seasonal Tasks, Seeds and Seeding, Wildflowers
Title: More on bluebonnets
Answered by: Stephen Brueggerhoff

QUESTION:

When can I harvest my Bluebonnets?

ANSWER:

The fruit/pods of the Bluebonnet turn colors from green to brown after flowering and successful pollination. Once brown and dry, the pod will split open dropping the seed to the ground. A trick I try is to shake the pods before they split open; the seeds inside will be mature when they rattle loose inside the pod. Bluebonnets (Lupinus sp.) are considered to be winter annuals, and planting of the seed should begin in early November. After germination, the seedlings over-winter, developing flowers for blooming in early to mid-March. The success of germination depends upon a symbiotic association with bacterium called Rhizobium. You can download horticultural articles about Bluebonnets from our Native Plant Library, a service of our Native Plant Information Network.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

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