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Tuesday - April 01, 2003

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: More on bluebonnets
Answered by: Stephen Brueggerhoff

QUESTION:

Is there such a thing as a red bluebonnet?

ANSWER:

The pigments associated with the red flower color are closely related to pigments for blue in flower color, and it is not uncommon to have a Bluebonnet (Lupinus sp.) express red. Chances are that the flowers from seed coming from this plant will revert back to its true blue color.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

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