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Saturday - July 21, 2007

From: Springfield, MO
Region: Midwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Wildflowers for September wedding in Missouri
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am interested in having wildflowers in my wedding in late September. Although the wedding is in the early fall I wanted to have dandelions but I was informed that they are not long lasting enough for a wedding. Any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants assumes your wedding is going to be in Missouri in September. You can find out what wildflowers will be in bloom in Missouri by doing a Combination Search in our Native Plants Database by choosing "Missouri" from Select State or Province and September and October (since your wedding will be in late September) from Bloom Characteristics: Time.

Here are a few suggestions for you from Mr. Smarty Plants:

Conoclinium coelestinum (blue mistflower)

Coreopsis tinctoria var. tinctoria (golden tickseed)

Erigeron annuus (eastern daisy fleabane)

Glandularia bipinnatifida var. bipinnatifida (Dakota mock vervain)

Helianthus maximiliani (Maximilian sunflower)

Liatris mucronata (cusp blazing star)

Ratibida columnifera (upright prairie coneflower)

Salvia azurea (azure blue sage)

Solidago altissima (late goldenrod)

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (New England aster)

Thelesperma filifolium var. filifolium (stiff greenthread)


Conoclinium coelestinum

Coreopsis tinctoria var. tinctoria

Erigeron annuus

Glandularia bipinnatifida var. bipinnatifida

Helianthus maximiliani

Liatris mucronata

Ratibida columnifera

Salvia azurea

Solidago altissima

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae

Thelesperma filifolium var. filifolium

 

 

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