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Thursday - June 21, 2007

From: El Reno, OK
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagation by seed of Capsicum annuum
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have always been told that the only way that a seed from a chili pequin pepper can germinate is that it has to be eaten by a bird and passed through it's digestive system. I have heard that there is a liquid solution that you could soak the seeds in to remove the coating from the seed so that it could be planted. Do you have any idea what this solution could be?

ANSWER:

Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum (chile pequin or chile piquin) is easy to grow from seed when planted after the weather has warmed according to Jill Nokes in How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest. She suggests the following treatment to increase germination success:

"High germination rates were achieved by aerating the seeds 2-3 days in a solution of water mixed with potassium nitrate (1 tablespoon per gallon) before sowing. Seeds will germinate in 10-20 days."


Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum

 

 

 

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