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Friday - June 08, 2007

From: Cleveland, OH
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification, Vines
Title: Identification of Matelea reticulata
Answered by: Nan Hampton


I recently saw blooming in an Austin park a small white-green flower ( 3/4 ") with a center that looked like a small pearl. Any idea what it is. I can't find it in my flower book, It was on a waist high somewhat leggy bush.


What you saw was Matelea reticulata (pearl milkweed vine), one of Mr. Smarty Plants favorite plants. It, along with other members of the Family Asclepiadaceae (Milkweed Family), is a host for the monarch butterfly. Texas has a wealth of milkweeds for monarchs to feed on.


Matelea reticulata

Matelea reticulata

Matelea reticulata




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