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Monday - May 28, 2007

From: Hico, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Vines
Title: Identification of possible Hairy Cluster Vine or Clematis
Answered by: Barbara Medford and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I found a small twining vine with purple to lavender, tubular flowers hanging on one side of the stem. The leaves are very narrow and alternate about 3/4"-1" long. I found them on the side of the road in Duffau or Hico TX. What is the plants name and is this plant native?

ANSWER:

Without seeing a picture of this plant, my best guess is that it is a Hairy Cluster Vine, Jacquemontia tamnifolia, a member of the Convolvulaceae family, the Morning Glory family. Another possibility is Purple Leatherflower, Clematis pitcheri. However, it is very difficult to correctly identify a species from written descriptions. If it is possible to send us a digital image of the plant in flower, please do so. You may send images to id@smartyplants.org. Usually, sharply-focused close-ups of foliage and flowers are most useful.


Clematis pitcheri

 

 

 

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