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Wednesday - May 09, 2007

From: Lago Vista , TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Winter damage to non-native Jasminum mesnyi
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I planted 6 shrubs in 2006 that I think are some type of jasmine that have yellow flowers. Can't remember the name. I live in Lago Vista TX just outside Austin. This year 3 are doing really well and 3 appear to be dying. I have fertilized them and we have had ample rain. Any suggestions?

ANSWER:

We aren't absolutely sure what you have, but suspect that it is probably Jasminum mesnyi, Primrose jasmine. This is a non-native and since our focus and expertise is with native plants of North America, it is not really within our purview. However, we do know that they are tough. Hard freezes can knock them back, but most of them in Austin survived this past winter unscathed. Perhaps Lago Vista temperatures were enough colder to make a difference to those three that are not doing well. Overwatering can also be a problem for them—they don't like standing in constantly wet soil. You can find more information about the care of your primrose jasmine at Backyard Gardener and The Flower Expert.

 

 

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