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Tuesday - May 01, 2007

From: Bellaire, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: How to propagate Texas red buckeye (Aesculus sp.) from seeds
Answered by: Nan Hampton


I have a Texas Red Buckeye that is doing very well. How do I propagate from the seeds that come off of that tree? Thanks,


The seeds of of all the buckeyes, including Aesculus pavia (red buckeye) or Aesculus glabra var. arguta (Texas or Ohio buckeye), germinate easily according to Jill Nokes in How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest. She explains that the seeds should be collected as soon as their outer covering begins to dry and curl back. They should be planted outdoors or in a cold frame as soon as they are collected. The seeds should be covered about an inch deep with soil and, if they are planted in a pot to be transplanted later, it needs to be deep enough to accomodate a long initial root. Avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. Although some seeds may germinate within a week, it may take a month or more for others to germinate. At first, most of their growing effort will be channeled into making a strong root system and they will not produce very much in the way of leaves until the spring growing season. You can read more about propagating and taking care of the Texas buckeye in Jill's book, available in the Wildflower Center gift store, probably in your local bookstore, and perhaps in your local library. For a detailed account of the species see the article from the US Forest Service.


Aesculus pavia

Aesculus glabra var. arguta




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