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Sunday - April 29, 2007

From: abilene, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Native plants for Italianate garden
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hi, I am looking at buying a house in Abilene, Texas that has an established burnt grass yard. The house is Italianate and requires bold plantings. Is there a way to establish a relatively Italinate garden and pots with native plants? There is an established border around the house of some ornamental shrub which is nice but obviously not native. There are no trees but I would add some. There is a trellis around the back pool for I think some grape climbers. The whole plot is at least 3 and 1/2 acres. I would appreciate some suggestions of mixing these two styles.

ANSWER:

Here are some suggestions for plants that are native to Taylor County, Texas that should thrive and be attractive additions to your property.

Trees

Cupressus arizonica (Arizona cypress)

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar)

Quercus buckleyi (Buckley oak)

Quercus fusiformis (plateau oak)

Ulmus americana (American elm)

Shrubs/Small trees

Abutilon fruticosum (Texas Indian mallow)

Amorpha fruticosa (desert false indigo)

Chilopsis linearis (desert willow)

Rhus microphylla (littleleaf sumac)

Ungnadia speciosa (Mexican buckeye)

Mahonia trifoliolata (agarita)

Herbaceous/Grasslike

Nolina texana (Texas beargrass)

Ephedra antisyphilitica (Mormon tea)

Ipomopsis rubra (Standing cypress)

Yucca glauca (Soapweed yucca)

Vines

Cissus trifoliata (Sorrelvine)

Ampelopsis cordata (Heartleaf peppervine)

Lonicera albiflora (Texas honeysuckle)


Cupressus arizonica

Juniperus virginiana

Quercus buckleyi

Quercus fusiformis

Ulmus americana

Abutilon fruticosum

Amorpha fruticosa

Chilopsis linearis

Rhus microphylla

Ungnadia speciosa

Mahonia trifoliolata

Nolina texana

Ephedra antisyphilitica

Ipomopsis rubra

Yucca glauca

Cissus trifoliata

Ampelopsis cordata

Lonicera albiflora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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