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Sunday - April 22, 2007

From: Bastrop, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Turf
Title: Mixing of bluebonnets and buffalograss in a lawn
Answered by: Damon Waitt

QUESTION:

I have moved into a house with a yard full of weeds. I would like to plant Buffalograss but understand Buffalograss is sparce and difficult to keep the weeds out. So, I was considering mixing it with Bluebonnet seeds to choke out those weeds. What do you think?

ANSWER:

Bouteloua dactyloides (buffalograss) is an attractive, fine-textured, low-water-use native grass that grows throughout the Great Plains from Minnesota to Montana and south into Mexico. It is well-adapted to areas receiving 15 to 30 inches of thorough, but infrequent rains, usually in April and May.

Weeds invariably appear after seeding or plugging Buffalograss and controlling them is one of the most difficult problems in establishing Buffalograss. Mr Smarty Plants likes your bluebonnet idea because bluebonnets look great in a Buffalograss lawn but it is doubtful that they will help control the weeds.

The best way to control weeds is to water and mow correctly. While established Buffalograss will survive summer droughts without supplemental water, it will go dormant. To keep your Buffalograss green during the summer, it must receive 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week.

To get the full story on Buffalo grass, download the Native Lawns how to article.


Bouteloua dactyloides

Lupinus texensis

 

 

 

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