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Tuesday - April 17, 2007

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Native wildflowers tolerant of lower water and lots of sun
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live in Austin Texas and have a small bed in the front of the house which faces the east with no shade. I am not much of a yard person so would like to plant some Native plants that don't need a lots of water or care. Do you have any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Here are several native Texans that should do well with lots of sunshine and little water:

Lantana urticoides (Texas lantana)

Coreopsis lanceolata (lanceleaf tickseed)

Glandularia bipinnatifida var. bipinnatifida (Dakota mock vervain)

Ruellia nudiflora (violet wild petunia)

Melampodium leucanthum (plains blackfoot)

Muhlenbergia reverchonii (seep muhly)


Lantana urticoides

Coreopsis lanceolata

Glandularia bipinnatifida var. bipinnatifida

Ruellia nudiflora

Melampodium leucanthum

Muhlenbergia reverchonii

 

 

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