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Thursday - March 29, 2007

From: Keller, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Toadflax and Baby Blue Eyes occurring naturally in Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Does Toadflax/Spurred Snapdragon occur naturally in Texas? My daughter found what I think is it in a field in Keller, TX, but I'm wondering if it is cultivated. The field is full of a variety of flowers and appears to have been planted. Also, I have the same question about "Baby Blue Eyes". My daughter has a project, but she can only use cultivated wildflowers if they are a "Texas Mix". We are wondering if she can use them. Thank you!

ANSWER:

There are two species of toadflax that occur in Texas, Nuttallanthus texanus (Texas toadflax) and Nuttallanthus canadensis (Canada toadflax), and there are records of both occurring in Tarrant County, Texas. Nemophila phacelioides (largeflower baby blue eyes) also occurs in Texas and has been reported in counties adjacent to Tarrant—Dallas, Ellis, and Johnson Counties.

 


Nuttallanthus texanus

Nuttallanthus canadensis

Nemophila phacelioides

 

 

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