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Wednesday - July 07, 2004

From: Greensboro, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Planting, Soils
Title: Patience for slow-growing Baptisia
Answered by: Stephen Brueggerhoff


I have three different varieties of well established Baptisia that I have had for several years ... none of them bloom. One of my plants got a very small flower in April, but just pooped out after that. They are pretty plants, nice foliage ... but I love the blooms that I never get. They are in very loamy soil ... about six inches of decayed leaf litter with clay underneath. Any suggestions?


The answer to your question lies in patience. Baptisia species are slow growing, generally providing blooming after a 2 to 3 year period of maturity. They are members of the Pea family (Fabaceae), have long taproots, do not respond well to transplanting, and most of the species require full sun with well draining soil. Depending on the species that you have acquired, next year may provide adequate blooming for you.


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