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Mr. Smarty Plants - Identification of wild plum found in Conroe, TX

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Friday - March 23, 2007

From: Conroe, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Identification of wild plum found in Conroe, TX
Answered by: Damon Waitt

QUESTION:

I have found a wild plum that has dirty pink flowers and reddish smooth bark in a field in the town of Conroe, Tx. Identification thru the Ag Man here was sketchy and inaccurate. Short stubby limbs with thorny endings of the branches and no others anywhere near it in an old field. Can you help?

ANSWER:

That's why we are here. Send us an email following the instructions to get help with your "wild plum" ID.

1. Tell us where and when you found the plant and describe the site where it occurred.

2. Take several images including details of leaves, stems, flowers, fruit, and the overall plant.

3. Save images in JPEG format, not more than 640 x 480 pixels in size, with resolution set at 300 pixels per inch.

4. Send email with images attached to id@smartyplants.org. Put Plant Identification Request in the subject line of your email.

 

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