En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - March 12, 2007

From: Williamson County, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Identification of native dogwoods in Williamson Co., TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hi Mr/Mrs SmartyPlants What are the small-ish wild trees that are blooming so beautifully now? They are practically covered in pretty white blossoms. I've always called them dogwoods but in the various plant books I've read it always seems to hint that they don't live around here. I know that the ornamental pears are starting to bloom now - these are not what I see - the one's I'm interested in are wild. I live in Williamson County. Thanks

ANSWER:

We think you are seeing Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum).

There is actually a dogwood, Cornus drummondii (roughleaf dogwood), that is native to Williamson County and most of Central Texas, but its blossoms don't look much like Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). Also, it doesn't usually begin blooming until April. Flowering dogwood does occur naturally east of Williamson County as near as Caldwell and Lee counties and, of course, you will find them as ornamentals growing in lawns in much of Central Texas.


Prunus mexicana

Cornus drummondii

Cornus florida

 

 

More Trees Questions

What kind of native Junipers will grow in zone 7?
June 25, 2009 - What kinds of native Juniper will grow in zone 7 ? (besides Juniperus scopulorum and J.virginiana).
view the full question and answer

Flowering Dogwood for NY
February 21, 2011 - Hello - can you advise me on a disease-resistant/hardy dogwood? Every nursery I've visited has discouraged me from planting dogwoods. What would you recommend? I live in Westchester County, NY
view the full question and answer

Tall screening tree for Santa Barbara, California
August 20, 2011 - Hi, we live in Santa Barbara, California. We are looking for a tree between 20-30 feet high to block the neighbors two-story house yet the area we have to plant is 3 feet from the fence to the drivewa...
view the full question and answer

Viability of Juniperus ashei for making furniture
June 18, 2007 - My husband uses juniper from Oregon to make beautiful furniture. Underneath the ugly bark is a wonderful wood. Is this the same Juniper as we saw all around Austin, Texas.
view the full question and answer

Would mountain ash (Sorbus sp.) grow in Michigan?
June 01, 2009 - I live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan between Cedarville (Lake Huron) and Sault Ste. Marie (Lake Superior.) We would like to plant a Mountian Ash because we love birds and they love the berries an...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center