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Sunday - August 17, 2014

From: Gainesville, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Edible Plants
Title: Recipe for Sideroxylon lanuginosum (Gum bumelia) fruits
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Do you have a recipe for using the fruits of Sideroxylon Lanuginosa?

ANSWER:

The only recipe I have found so far for Sideroxylon lanuginosum (Gum bumelia) occurs in Delena Tull's Edible and Useful Plants of the Southwest:  Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.  Rev. ed. 2013.  University of Texas Press.   She has a recipe for Coma Jelly on page 200.  Here is the paraphrased recipe:

It requires 2 cups fruit, 1/4 cup of sugar and 3 tablespoons of pectin.  The fruits are put in a pan and covered with water.  They are simmered for 15 minutes, then crushed and strained through cheesecloth to remove the seeds and skins.  The pectin is added to the liquid and heated to a rolling boil, then the sugar is added and returned to a rolling boil.  Boiling is continued for 1 to 3 minutes until the liquid passes the jelly test.

They are good to eat on their own, but Ms. Tull says they don't work well in baked goods because of the size of their seeds.

 

From the Image Gallery


Gum bumelia
Sideroxylon lanuginosum

Gum bumelia
Sideroxylon lanuginosum

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