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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
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Wednesday - March 07, 2007

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Possible identification of Stemless Evening Primrose
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Recently, in a very dry area, some interesting plants have emerged. The plant looks like a very short dandelion but the yellow flowers look like yellow morning glories. The flowers are open in the morning and twist close as the day progresses. The entire plant is not more than an inch tall even when it's spread is over a foot. Any idea what this is?

ANSWER:

From your description, the only plant that comes to mind is Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba). After seeing the photographs in our Native Plants Database if you don't think that is what it is, we invite you to send us a digital photo. You can find instructions for submitting photos for identification on the Ask Mr. Smarty Plants page.
 

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