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Tuesday - May 06, 2014

From: Mechanicsville, VA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Vines
Title: Waiting for a Passiflora to Emerge
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

My passiflora vine in Virginia seems to have died in our severe winter. Should I continue to wait for new growth or dig it up now and start again?

ANSWER:

It is quite possible that the harsh 2013-2014 winter could have caused your Passiflora (passion flower) vine to succumb to the cold temperatures, freezing and thawing weather or waterlogged soil. Without knowing which of the six native passiflora you have, Mr. Smarty Plants can't pinpoint the exact reason. But, by this time your vine should have leaved out or sent up new shoots from the base. So, use this as an opportunity to start anew. The six native passionflowers are Passiflora affinis (bracted passionflower), Passiflora foetida (corona de cristo), Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower), Passiflora lutea (yellow passion vine), Passiflora suberosa (corkstem passionvine), and Passiflora tenuiloba (big wing passionflower).

The hardiest of these native vines are Passiflora incarnata (zone 7) and Passiflora lutea (zone 6).

 

From the Image Gallery


Bracted passionflower
Passiflora affinis

Corona de cristo
Passiflora foetida

Purple passionflower
Passiflora incarnata

Yellow passion vine
Passiflora lutea

Bird wing passionflower
Passiflora tenuiloba

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