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Friday - April 25, 2014

From: Elmendorf, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Seeds and Seeding, Wildflowers
Title: Viability of Lupinus havardii seeds from Elmendorf TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have been able to grow several Lupinus havardii (Big Bend Bluebonnet) and they are now making seed. Is there anyway to determine if a seed is good or bad for this plant?

ANSWER:

As it happens, we have a recent previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer on the viability of bluebonnet seeds, with links to more information on the subject. That question was from Houston and just addressed bluebonnets in general. According to this USDA Plant Profile Map, Lupinus havardii (Big bend bluebonnet) only grows natively in two counties, Presidio and Brewster, deep in the (what else?) Big Bend area of Texas. So, we have no idea if you can grow them successfully in Central Texas. First, follow this plant link, Lupinus havardii (Big bend bluebonnet), to our webpage on the plant and compare the growing conditions on that with what you have in your garden (sun? soil? moisture?) and then give it a try. What do you have to lose if you already have seedlings? Be sure and read our How-To Articles on How to Grow Bluebonnets and Scarification FAQs.

 

From the Image Gallery


Big bend bluebonnet
Lupinus havardii

Big bend bluebonnet
Lupinus havardii

Big bend bluebonnet
Lupinus havardii

Big bend bluebonnet
Lupinus havardii

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