En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - March 27, 2014

From: Fort Worth, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives
Title: Why is Common Horehound missing from NPIN?
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Hi there, I am not able to find Marrubium vulgare, i.e. Common or White Horehound, in the Native Plant Database. It grows abundantly on our ranch in Central Texas, and I am attempting to grow it in my yard in Fort Worth.

ANSWER:

Be careful what you wish for!

Marrubium vulgare is not listed in the NPIN Native Plant Database because it's not a North American native species.  It's native to northern Africa and Eurasia.  However, it has made itself quite at home in North America where it's an aggressive colonizer of livestock lots (domesticated livestock will not eat it) and associated areas.  It has also escaped from agricultural lands and can be found in great abundance in some wild areas all across North America.  Surprisingly, Horehound has not yet made its way onto any state's or the federal government's noxious weed list.  It's just a matter of time.

As for growing it in the garden, you will probably find it a bit too aggressive for your taste and once established, it's all but impossible to eradicate.  Moreover, your neighbors might not be very happy with you for introducing a plague into their gardens.  But whether or not to plant it in your garden is for you to decide.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Problems with non-native fruit trees in Katy TX
May 13, 2010 - I have several species of fruit trees growing. pear, lime, orange, pluot, plum, variegated orange, peach, lemon all planted in ground, some this year and some last year: My lemon (approx 15 gallon) an...
view the full question and answer

Can trimmings from non-native globe willows be planted from Broken Arrow OK?
June 13, 2010 - We have 2 globe willow trees in our back yard. We trim low hanging branches. Can we take these cut branches, -plant them and have it grow into a new globe willow tree?
view the full question and answer

Leaves browning on non-native willow from in Cumbla PA
July 10, 2011 - We recently planted a willow tree. A lot of the leaves turned yellow and some turned brown, but it is also getting some new buds. my question is, should I take the dead leaves off or leave them there...
view the full question and answer

Pruning of non-native Senna bicapsularis from Ocean Springs MS
April 04, 2013 - I have 4 Senna plants (cassia bicapsularis) that I planted late last spring. They about 3-4 feet tall but are very gangly with leaves at or near the tips only. How should I prune them to encourage g...
view the full question and answer

Thrips on non-native roses in Austin
June 11, 2009 - How can I get rid of thrips that have totally invaded all of my roses?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center